Second AAU/ICSU Scientific Conference

Second AAU/ICSU Scientific Conference 11/25/2016 to 11/26/2016

Second AAU/ICSU Scientific Conference

Second AAU/ICSU Scientific Conference 11/25/2016 to 11/26/2016

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Learn the importance of joining The Association Residency..

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Meet AAU's President - Dr Stephen Ttendo Ssenyonjo

Welcome to the Association of Anaesthesiologists of Uganda (AAU). The aim of `the Association is to provide a platform for members to associate and advance the interests of the Association and its members. We shall achieve this by advocating for improved patient care and safety, facilitating the process of knowledge acquisition of our members, encouraging regional and international collaborations and always advance and support any other interests of our members. I therefore encourage you to become an active member of the AAU. Help us shape our Association by providing us with your comments and Ideas.

Who are anesthesiologists?

Today’s anesthesiologists are physicians who apply their knowledge of medicine to fulfill their primary role in the operating room, which is not only to ensure your comfort during surgery, but also to make informed medical judgments to protect you. These include treating and regulating changes in your critical life functions—breathing, heart rate, blood pressure—as they are affected by the surgery being performed. These medical specialists are the doctors who will immediately diagnose and treat any medical problems that might arise during your surgery or recovery period.

Presenter:  Anthony M. Roche                             

                     Associate professor of Anesthesiology and global health

                     University of Washington, Seattle USA

Venue:  Arcadia Suites

Thank you for visiting our site, we shall keep you posted about any activities and news concerning our association right here!!

As a general rule, you should not eat or drink anything after midnight before your surgery. Under some circumstances, you may be given permission by your anesthesiologist to drink clear liquids up to a few hours before your anesthesia.

All operations and all anesthesia have some risks, and they are dependent upon many factors including the type of surgery and the medical condition of the patient. Fortunately, adverse events are very rare. Your anesthesiologist takes precautions to prevent an accident from occurring just as you do when driving a car or crossing the street.

The specific risks of anesthesia vary with the particular procedure and the condition of the patient. You should ask your anesthesiologist about any risks that may be associated with your anesthesia.

Obesity is defined as body mass index (BMI) greater than 30kg/m2 and poses a number of problems for anaesthesia.
Firstly, obesity is associated with high blood pressure and heart disease. Heart disease may be secondary to coronary artery disease or due to enlarged heart with reduced function.
Secondly, oxygen delivery to tissues is decreased in obese patients, which makes obese people more prone to oxygen lack if there are additional difficulties in delivering oxygen to them.
Thirdly, obesity may be associated with hiatus hernia of the stomach and there is a higher risk of regurgitation and aspiration.
Obtaining intravenous access and performing regional anaesthesia may be difficult.
For these and other reasons, it is advisable for patients who are overweight or obese to lose weight prior to elective surgery.
If significant weight loss is not possible, even small weight loss is beneficial. Where patients are able to do so, light exercise, such as a 30 minute walk each day before surgery, will be helpful and make postoperative recovery easier for the patient. You can start with walking 10 minutes each day and increase to 20 minutes per day and then achieve 30 minutes per day.

This experience, known as “awareness”, is one of the biggest concerns for patients about to undergo surgery. Though it may worry patients, this condition can be almost entirely eliminated by the anaesthetist, with fewer than 1 in a 1000 patients remembering any part of their operation and most of these not recalling any pain.
Conscious awareness without recall of pain is more common; it has been estimated at 0.1 to 0.7 per cent of cases (1 in 142 to 1 in 1000).
Some operations are associated with a higher risk of awareness than others. They include cardiac surgery, emergency surgery, surgery associated with significant blood loss and caesarean section.
Specialised monitoring equipment is available to assist anaesthetists to assess the depth of anaesthesia. Such equipment includes processed electro-encephalography such as Bispectral Index Scale (BIS) and Entropy, which record electrical wave patterns in the brain and assign a score which reflects the depth of unconsciousness. These monitors have been shown to reduce the incidence of awareness, particularly in high-risk cases.